fascinated by eddie redmayne's upper lip
an intricate study into the many ways eddie redmayne ruins lives

Eddie Redmayne and Dominic Cooper at Audi Polo - June 26, 2014

Eddie Redmayne and Dominic Cooper at Audi Polo - June 26, 2014

The most harrowing scene is almost wordless, as Hawking inches his agonised way up the stairs to where his baby son Robert looks on from above, dumbly witnessing his own father’s regression to sub-toddler mobility. (x)

- Are you going to talk about this or not?

- Please, can you just go?

it’s one of the most powerful dynasties in the universe. there are three primary heirs.

bespokeredmayne:

MODEL BEHAVIOR: Eddie Redmayne’s U.S. tour has it all—movie promotion, time with friends, fashion. “@IseWhite: Fitting today with Eddie Redmayne for our new cover story, shot by #robertmaxwell”

bespokeredmayne:

MODEL BEHAVIOR: Eddie Redmayne’s U.S. tour has it all—movie promotion, time with friends, fashion.
“@IseWhite: Fitting today with Eddie Redmayne for our new cover story, shot by #robertmaxwell”

ttoe press   babe  
bespokeredmayne:

THIS TURTLENECK LOOK IS SOMETHING NEW: Eddie Redmayne with his glam crew from Celestine Agency in LA

bespokeredmayne:

THIS TURTLENECK LOOK IS SOMETHING NEW: Eddie Redmayne with his glam crew from Celestine Agency in LA

Eddie Redmayne & Kate Mara (x)

xoxoeddie:

Eddie Redmayne in You&Me This morning (WCIU) on Oct. 13, 2014

bespokeredmayne:

THE EDITOR OF INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE EXPLAINS WHY EDDIE REDMAYNE IS ONLY THE 4TH LIVNG ACTOR TO APPEAR ON THE COVER:
When you edit a cultural magazine, you have to decide where you stand on actors. There are a lot of them, they are highly recognisable, and many are on offer as interviewees. But the offer often has a Faustian tinge: if you accept, you lose a piece of your magazine’s soul. Not to the actor or actress concerned, who is probably deeply soulful, but to the grim machinery behind them. The interview may be for only an hour, it may be in a hotel, the publicist may be in the room: everything conspiring to deliver a piece of pap. And star power—or PR power—is now such that photo approval, even copy approval, is not uncommon. Our parentage, at the independent-minded Economist Group, means that we couldn’t play that game even if we wanted to.
The day after our last issue closed, an e-mail came in from Clemency Burton-Hill, who wrote our cover story on Gustavo Dudamel in 2013. She had embarked on a piece about Eddie Redmayne. “I realise most actors are far from your Platonic ideal, being PR’d to within an inch of their lives,” she wrote, “but Eddie is a different kettle of fish—clever & thoughtful, and he has had this extraordinary year playing Stephen Hawking for ‘The Theory of Everything’, for which I’ve been quietly observing him at close quarters…” Quietly observing: that sounded like us.
Clemency’s piece is not a profile of Redmayne, although you get to know him reasonably well by the end of it: it’s the story of a project. In a telling moment, he talks about being at Cambridge, where he read history of art and used to rub shoulders with the engineering students, whose faculty was next door. Redmayne felt bad because he and his arts mates worked far less than the engineers, yet they would all end up with “a number, a degree”. (The difference comes at the end of the rainbow, where the engineers find a pot of job security.) His own grasp of science, he admits, was faint: he had to have some of Hawking’s theories explained to him as if to a six-year-old. But in the way he applied himself to capturing the remorseless onset of Motor Neurone Disease, he turns out to have been a fine student of biology. “The second a muscle goes,” he says, “it can’t come back again in a different scene. It’s not something the director can fudge in the edit.” By interviewing Redmayne several times, never in a hotel room, let alone with a PR hovering, Burton-Hill gets under the skin of a formidable piece of work.
Tim de Lisle is editor of Intelligent Life
FIND THE ARTICLE HERE—ONE OF THE MOST INSIGHTFUL EVER ABOUT EDDIE: http://moreintelligentlife.com/content/features/clemency-burton-hill/method?page=4

bespokeredmayne:

THE EDITOR OF INTELLIGENT LIFE MAGAZINE EXPLAINS WHY EDDIE REDMAYNE IS ONLY THE 4TH LIVNG ACTOR TO APPEAR ON THE COVER:

When you edit a cultural magazine, you have to decide where you stand on actors. There are a lot of them, they are highly recognisable, and many are on offer as interviewees. But the offer often has a Faustian tinge: if you accept, you lose a piece of your magazine’s soul. Not to the actor or actress concerned, who is probably deeply soulful, but to the grim machinery behind them. The interview may be for only an hour, it may be in a hotel, the publicist may be in the room: everything conspiring to deliver a piece of pap. And star power—or PR power—is now such that photo approval, even copy approval, is not uncommon. Our parentage, at the independent-minded Economist Group, means that we couldn’t play that game even if we wanted to.

The day after our last issue closed, an e-mail came in from Clemency Burton-Hill, who wrote our cover story on Gustavo Dudamel in 2013. She had embarked on a piece about Eddie Redmayne. “I realise most actors are far from your Platonic ideal, being PR’d to within an inch of their lives,” she wrote, “but Eddie is a different kettle of fish—clever & thoughtful, and he has had this extraordinary year playing Stephen Hawking for ‘The Theory of Everything’, for which I’ve been quietly observing him at close quarters…” Quietly observing: that sounded like us.

Clemency’s piece is not a profile of Redmayne, although you get to know him reasonably well by the end of it: it’s the story of a project. In a telling moment, he talks about being at Cambridge, where he read history of art and used to rub shoulders with the engineering students, whose faculty was next door. Redmayne felt bad because he and his arts mates worked far less than the engineers, yet they would all end up with “a number, a degree”. (The difference comes at the end of the rainbow, where the engineers find a pot of job security.) His own grasp of science, he admits, was faint: he had to have some of Hawking’s theories explained to him as if to a six-year-old. But in the way he applied himself to capturing the remorseless onset of Motor Neurone Disease, he turns out to have been a fine student of biology. “The second a muscle goes,” he says, “it can’t come back again in a different scene. It’s not something the director can fudge in the edit.” By interviewing Redmayne several times, never in a hotel room, let alone with a PR hovering, Burton-Hill gets under the skin of a formidable piece of work.

Tim de Lisle is editor of Intelligent Life

FIND THE ARTICLE HERE—ONE OF THE MOST INSIGHTFUL EVER ABOUT EDDIE: http://moreintelligentlife.com/content/features/clemency-burton-hill/method?page=4

article  

My trajectory has always been a little bipolar—I’m caught between the Elizabethans and the crazies.